Campfire Audio's Atlas

As soon as I completed the review of Campfire Audio’s Comet, I immediately reached back out to my contact there, requesting to review their step-up from that product – the Atlas. This product occupies somewhat the same form factor, but a distinctly different market segment, with this product costing more than 6x the Comet.

True to form and cost, this is a premium UIEM and performs in leagues with some of the best that I’ve heard – but we’ll dive into that soon enough.

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Beyerdynamic's Amiron Wireless

I was very happy to finally get something for review from Beyerdynamic - I rarely review headphones from companies whose specific purpose is neutrality, particularly in the portable market. The Amiron Wireless is a classically utilitarian execution of Beyerdynamic’s house sound; the headphone is generally neutral, although the highs are somewhat bright, particularly in this closed context. However, for the mixer-on-the-go or the classical-music-fan or those that simply prefer uncolored sound, these are a very solid option.

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Campfire Audio's Comet

It’s always a pleasure for me to receive an email from Campfire Audio. This time, they sent over a pair of their newest IEMs, the Comet. They fall in CA’s more modest price-range, around $200. The last headphones I reviewed from them were their $800 Cascade which, while one of my favorite headphones of all time, are prohibitively expensive for many, if not most. Let’s jump in.

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Fostex's T60RP

Fostex sent me a pair of their newly released T60RP to test out about a month back. This is the next iteration in their RP (Regular Phase) series, following the famous T50RP, which I have only heard as modifications. This employs some of the same orthodynamic technology that has served Fostex well in the past, and I'm glad that I was able to take the time to really put them through their paces.

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Venture Electronic's Asura 2.0s

After my review of the famous Monk+, Lee at Venture Electronics sent me one of their mid-range offerings: the Asura 2.0s. In the configuration that I received, it costs a cool $88, with a TRRS 1/8" auxiliary connector as the termination. Although it has a very high impedance (150 Ω), its high sensitivity (110 dB SPL/mW) allows it to be relatively competently driven from a phone or portable player.

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Impressions: Periodic Audio's Titanium IEM

IEM 2 of 3 from Periodic Audio. I really enjoyed what I've yet heard of their high-end offering, and I'm excited to see if this offers similar performance. Again, Periodic Audio design, machines, and tools every single element of this headphone in-house, which is something that I haven't often seen, particularly from in-ear manufacturers. This has gone great for them thus far, so let's see if it continues.

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Impressions: Periodic Audio's Beryllium IEM

After much waiting, as they made their rounds around the reviewing community, all three of Dan at Periodic Audio's new bespoke IEMs have made their way to me. I say bespoke, by the way, as not one part of any of these products are designed, machined, or tooled by anyone but Periodic Audio: they're all made in-house. Let's get to it...

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Impressions: Unique Melody's Maestro V2

Unique Melody reached out to me a few weeks ago, wanting to send me something for review. After much discussion, most of which was figuring out which IEM of theirs fell in line with my listening preferences, we landed on their flagship, 12-driver per side UIEM, the Maestro V2. I took receipt of it today and, although there is a bunch for me to do right now, they've spent the remainder of their time in my possession in my ears.

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